VIRTUAL REALITY BECOMES A REALITY - PART II: Entering the Mainstream

Posted on: November 21, 2015 by Nettel Media

Category: General

VIRTUAL REALITY BECOMES A REALITY - PART II: Entering the Mainstream

 

Part One of our virtual reality (VR) series focused on some of the big players in VR hardware development, and some key points for filmmakers and film viewers interested in this space. In this post, we’ll be highlighting notable content providers that are working on strategies to incorporate this iconic technology into their service offerings.

 

In time for this years’Black Friday, Hulu will be releasing their own virtual reality app. Users of this application can choose their own viewing experience, such as sitting on Jerry Seinfield’s blue couch while watching shows on Hulu. According to Variety, the company also plans to “produce original content and curate films for VR platforms, starting with a short film as a bonus feature”for one of their series.

 

Similarly, Netflix is rumoured to be in talks with Oculus VR to develop an app for Samsung Gear that will allow users to immerse themselves in a Netflix viewing area resembling a living room. In a Netflix guest blog post, Oculus CTO John Carmack highlights how important it is to ensure TV and movie viewers are included in the VR movement and not just gamers.

 

One of the most talked about announcements regarding VR and content providers is the news that the New York Times will be shipping out over a million Google Cardboard’s to their long-term digital subscribers on November 7th. The interesting thing to note here is that the subscribers didn’t have to pay anything extra aside from their subscription fee. Google Cardboard will be shipped to them for free and the NYT VR app is also free on iOS and Android. This is a large moment, one that Wired is dubbing “VR’s Big Mainstream Moment.

 

What does this all mean? Well, the way we intersect with content providers is going to change in a big way, and not just for the very wealthy. With cost-effective products like Google Cardboard and Samsung’s $99 VR headset, virtual reality is really set to shake things up.

 

What do you think about VR? Do you anticipate using it in the (very near) future yourself? Let us know on Facebook and Twitter!

 

Photo: pestoverde via Flickr Creative Commons 

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